Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Richmond, Virginia

Renovation of an 19th-century mansion to serve as a visitor center

One of the oldest buildings in Richmond’s Boulevard Historic District, the Robinson House was originally built in 1820. The Italianate-style mansion, set prominently on the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts’ 15-acre campus, was renovated and expanded to serve as a visitor center and administrative offices for the museum. The project refurbished the original 7,600 square feet and expanded the three-story facility by 3,200 square feet, creating exhibition and meeting space, adding a new entry pavilion, and improving accessibility. Mueller provided complete MEP services for the rehabilitation and adaptive reuse project.

In the museum’s main building, Mueller was also tasked with HVAC upgrades to support the renovation of the renowned Fabergé and Russian Decorative Arts Exhibition. The improvements, which include new, raised ductwork to support a higher ceiling within the exhibition area, also serve the museum’s 18th-century paintings gallery and an adjacent kitchen.

Architect

Glavé & Holmes Architecture

Client History

2019: Robinson House Renovation; Glavé & Holmes Architecture
2016: Fabergé Exhibit Area; Glavé & Holmes Architecture
2012: Replacement of Air Handling Units

“Robinson House Renovation”

The renovation of this historic property is featured in Traditional Building magazine.

View additional Museum, Visitor/Conservation Center, and Preservation projects

  • For 20 years Robinson House was vacant and used for storage, until we rehabilitated the building and brought it back to life.

    Steven Blashfield, AIA, LEED AP
    Principal, Glavé & Holmes Architecture
  • For 20 years Robinson House was vacant and used for storage, until we rehabilitated the building and brought it back to life.

    Steven Blashfield, AIA, LEED AP
    Principal, Glavé & Holmes Architecture